Comfort aid

A number of people choose not to visit the dentist for regular check-ups because they are afraid or suffer from dental anxiety. We want our patients to be as comfortable as possible while they are in our care. We offer several comfort aids for patients to make their visit more enjoyable. The following comfort aids are used in our office.


Topical Anesthetic: A flavoured ointment that is directly applied on the inside of the patient’s mouth to numb the area that the dentist will be administering an injection. Dentists use this to ease the discomfort when administering the local anesthetic before procedures.


Local Anesthetic: Medicine that is injected into the gum or inner cheek to numb a part of the patient’s mouth for the duration of the dental procedure. Often, the patient will fell numb even for a couple of hours after the treatment. This is normal although it may be difficult to eat or drink. We advise patients to call our office immediately if pain is experienced after the numbing subside.


Conscious Sedation: Sedation can be used for everything from restoration procedures to a simple tooth cleaning. How it’s used depends on the severity of the fear.


Sedation dentistry uses medication to help patients relax during dental procedures. It’s sometimes referred to as “sleep dentistry,” although that’s not entirely accurate. Patients are usually awake with the exception of those who are under general anesthesia.

The levels of sedation we use include:
  1. Minimal sedation — you are awake but relaxed
  2. Moderate sedation (formerly called “conscious sedation”) — you may slur your words when speaking and not remember much of the procedure.

It very important that we have your up-to-date medical history, so we are aware of any medications you are taking or allergies you may have before administering any sedation.

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Regular Dental Visit

Our dental hygiene cleaning department at My Dentist Surrey @ Boundary Park is dedicated to assisting you in maintaining your optimal dental health. Maintaining your natural smile is our #1 priority.

As well as taking care of your oral health, we are also concerned about your overall health. At each regular dental visit, your medication and general health will be reviewed. We do a comprehensive cancer screening and TMJ symptom screening. We are always on the lookout for other markers that may indicate a more serious health condition such as diabetes or sleep apnea. A hygiene visit is a perfect time to bring up any dental concerns or issues and health matters you may have. Our kind and caring, highly experienced Surrey Dentist & Surrey Dental Hygienists are always eager to catch up on your life adventures.


5 steps to a healthy & cleaner mouth:
  1. Keep your mouth clean, floss every day, brush twice a day.
  2. Eating a well-balanced diet and keep hydrated.
  3. See our Surrey Dental Office every four to six months.
  4. Don’t use Tobacco products.
  5. Don’t wait until you have a toothache or dental emergency please contact us ASAP!

What Happens During a Routine Dental Checkup?

What happens during a typical checkup? Well, let us tell you all about it!

According to the Canadian Dental Association, about 80% of Canadians visit their dentist at least once each year for a regular dental checkup. However many people have little to no idea what is actually happening in their mouth while they’re in the dental chair.

Hearing strange noises and having someone work inside your mouth can understandably cause a lot of stress and anxiety. But not to worry, we’re here to tell you exactly what will be going on from start to finish the next time you visit our Dentist in Surrey for a routine checkup. After all, the more you know about something, the less scary it seems!

Say hello to our friendly receptionist

The first person you’ll meet during your dental appointment is the receptionist. She makes things flow smoothly around the office, coordinate payments and appointments, and give you your notifications for when you’re supposed to come in next. We have a lot of love for our dental receptionists!

Meeting our Hygienist or Certified Dental Assistant (CDA) in Surrey

The next person you’ll meet after checking in for your dental appointment, and the person you’ll spend the most time with, is your dental hygienist, or perhaps a CDA. It can vary whether your appointment will involve a CDA or a hygienist, but there is a notable difference between the two.

Our Surrey Hygienists are trained dental professionals who take care of routine dental care, such as regular cleanings and assist our Surrey Dentists in other procedures. They are an integral part of any dental practice in Surrey, BC and make up a big part of the team that works to keep your oral health at its best.

CDAs don’t do as much of the nitty-gritty cleaning work that hygienists do, but they provide excellent help with the preparation work and with assisting dentists during procedures.

You can think of both of these roles as the truly unsung heroes of a dental practice!

Your Dental History

Before anything is done inside your mouth, our dental hygienist will need to know about your medical history if this is your first appointment at our Surrey Dental Office or, if you have been to the practice before, any changes in your health such as new medications, diabetes, arthritis, pregnancy, etc. It is important that our Surrey Dental Care Team knows about any health concerns, anxieties, or allergies you may have in order to avoid incidents and to make sure you get the kind of care you need.

And when we say that we want you to tell us about any concerns or anxieties you have, we mean it! Don’t be a hero and try to be brave – it’s VERY common to be afraid of the dentist. Sometimes, all a person needs is a little explanation or a little listening to their fears to make things seem a little better.

Dentist Teeth Cleaning

Now that you have shared your health concerns, our team of dental professionals can start working inside your mouth. The first thing they will do is give your teeth a thorough cleaning. They start by scraping off built-up plaque and tartar that collects above and below the gum line before flossing between and around every tooth to remove any plaque or food particles that are clinging on.

Our Surrey Clean Team will also give your teeth a smooth and shiny finish using a tooth polisher with a spinning head and slightly abrasive paste. The polishing will get rid of any residue that was previously missed and will make your teeth smoother so that plaque will not collect as easily on them between visits to the dentist.

Examining the teeth

Now that your pearly whites are squeaky clean, it’s time to have a look at any problem areas in your mouth. A metal probe with a small angled mirror will be used, which will help them see behind and between teeth and gums, as well as check for the softening of tooth enamel and dentin.

Our Surrey Hygienist will also be on the lookout for the swelling of gums in any areas, mouth sores, and redness. Finally, our dentists will measure your mouth’s periodontal pockets, which are the spaces between the top of the gum line and where the gum tissues firmly attaches to the tooth. Ideally, this pocket should only be between one and three millimeters deep, however deeper pockets can be a sign of gum disease and thus should be closely monitored.

Dental X-Ray

The last thing to do is take dental x-ray pictures of your mouth so our Dentist in Surrey can see if there are any issues below the mouth’s surface. This involves biting down on a piece of specially designed plastic while an x-ray imaging machine is placed against your cheek. The resulting image will show the visible parts of your teeth as well as the roots below the gum line and your jaw bones, allowing our dentist to see exactly what is happening in your mouth and assign your oral care as needed.

We want to mention here our Surrey Dental Office only recommends digital x-rays, which emit up to 90% less radiation, allow for easy storage, and take less time than traditional machines – which means shorter, more convenient, and safer visits for you!

Dental Exam at My Dentist Surrey

The dental exam is different from the initial examination that our hygienist completed as this one is done by our dentist. Our dentists will use your dental x-rays to see if there is any loss of bone, fractures, or any other abnormality below your visible gum line before moving on to look for issues with jaw alignment, teeth grinding, and oral cancer.

Generally, our dentist in Surrey, BC will feel your jaw bones from outside of your mouth while you bite down to ensure that your bite is smooth, aligned, and there is no clicking or popping from your jaw joints. They will also inspect the grooves of your teeth to see if any of them have been cracked or smoothed down due to grinding or jaw clenching. Finally, our dentist will gently feel behind your jaw and your neck to see if there are any signs of oral cancer.

Once all of this is done, our dentist should have a full understanding of what your oral health needs are, and will be able to prescribe any necessary dental treatments to prevent or treat your issues.

Dental Results & Advice

After the dental exam is complete, our Surrey Dentist will let you know exactly what is going on in your mouth and will advise you about next steps. Sometimes this involves scheduling another dental appointment at our Surrey Dental Office for a procedure while other times our Surrey Dentist will give you advice about what you can do at home to better your oral health. It is extremely important that you listen to this advice and put it into action as best you can to ensure that your next checkup is the best it can be.

Future Dental Appointments

The final step of the routine dental checkup is scheduling your next one for a date four to six months in the future. Scheduling your next appointment right away is the easiest and most effective way to ensure that you don’t forget to have your dental checkup regularly. Even if you are diligent in your personal dental care, there is no better protection against oral issues than having your mouth professionally cleaned and monitored.

Take a trip to our front desk and once again you’ll be helped out by a smiling and attentive dental receptionist. And, as always, if you have any questions or concerns about any part of your dental visit or your upcoming scheduled visits, make sure to let her know. Trust us, she doesn’t bite. We’re very strict about that sort of thing.

To schedule a dental cleaning with My Dentists @ Boundary Park in Surrey, BC please call (604) 597-8808 or visit our Surrey Dental Office at 121-6350 120th St Surrey, BC V3X 1Y7. We accept walk-ins and dental emergencies!

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X-Rays

Every day we are all exposed to natural radiation in our environment. Our digital x-rays produce a significant lower level of radiation compared to the dental x-rays of the past. Not only are digital x-rays better for your health, they’re faster and more comfortable and reliable. We usually recommend a Panorex for our new patients (good for 3-5 years) and bitewing x-rays, which are usually taken at the beginning of your regular check-up and cleaning.


5 reasons why we take X-Rays in our office:
  1. Diagnose decay.
  2. Check for bone loss.
  3. Check old fillings.
  4. Show abnormalities at the very bottom of the root of the tooth.
  5. To confirm areas to be treated before procedures.

For more information or if you have concerns regarding our x-ray procedures and machine, feel free to contact My Dentist @ Boundary Park at: (604) 597-8808 to speak with one of our dental professionals.

 dental x rays in surrey

Frequently Asked Questions About X-Rays

1. What is Dental x-rays?

Dental x-rays are a form of imaging test that dentists use to learn more about the health of your teeth. A dentist can discover a lot about your teeth and gums simply by examining them with the naked eye. However, dental problems such as tooth decay and infections can often only be properly diagnosed by looking beneath the surface. x-rays use small amounts of radiation to create images on the film called radiographs. As x-rays pass through the mouth, they’re absorbed by the tissue. Some tissue, as well as denser objects, absorb more x-rays than others. Teeth appear in lighter shades on a radiograph, while cavities and tooth decay show up in darker patches. These images help dentists to identify problems with the teeth.

2. What is Digital x-rays?

Digital radiography (digital x-ray) is the latest technology used to take dental x-rays. This technique uses an electronic sensor (instead of x-ray film) that captures and stores the digital image on a computer. This image can be instantly viewed and enlarged helping the dentist and dental hygienist detect problems easier. Digital x-rays reduce radiation 80-90% compared to the already low exposure of traditional dental x-rays.

3. Who needs dental x-rays?

Dental x-rays are just another tool in the oral care arsenal. The cleaning and visual examination of your teeth, gums, and the rest of your mouth serve to keep the exposed portions of your mouth healthy.

However, a lot can go on beneath the gum line or inside of teeth themselves that dentists cannot see without x-rays. While you might wonder why you need x-rays when there’s no outward indication that something is wrong, this tool can provide early warning of potential problems (like small cavities), allowing for treatment before they become much bigger issues.

4. How often should patients get x-rays?

The frequency of x-rays varies by dental office and by the patient. Some patients may only need x-rays annually, while others need them every six months, or even more frequently, depending on developing conditions.

Frequency depends on the current condition of your mouth and your dental history. Do you frequently get cavities? If you answer yes, then you may require x-rays annually. If you haven’t had a cavity in five years, then you can go years between x-rays.

Dentists make careful assessments about if and when patients need x-rays, carefully weighing the benefits and potential risks before deciding on any tests or courses of treatment. If x-rays are recommended, it is likely with good reason.

5. Who will need x-rays every 6 months?

Children – Many children need x-rays every six months, depending on age, because they are highly likely to develop caries and the nerve inside their teeth is much larger than an adult. This means that a very small amount of decay can cause large problems very quickly. X-rays also help monitor tooth development.

Adults with extensive restoration work, including fillings. Previous dental work indicates high risk for new decay.

Anyone who drinks sugary sodas, chocolate milk or coffee or tea with sugar – Even mildly sugary beverages create an environment in the mouth that’s perfect for decay, so anyone who drinks these beverages regularly will need to have more regular x-rays.

People with periodontal (gum) disease – Periodontal treatments may need to be stepped up if there are significant or continuing signs of bone loss.

People who are taking medications that lead to dry mouth, also called xerostomia – Saliva helps keep the acid levels (pH) in the mouth stable. In a dry mouth, the pH decreases, causing the minerals in the teeth to break down, leaving them prone to caries. Medications that can decrease saliva are those prescribed for hypertension, antidepressants, antianxiety drugs, antihistamines, diuretics, narcotics, anticonvulsants and anticholinergics.

People who have dry mouth because of disease, such as Sjögren’s syndrome, or because of medical treatments that damaged the salivary glands, such as radiation to the head and neck for cancer treatment.

Smokers, because smoking increases the risk of periodontal disease.

6. Should patients be worried about radiation?

This is a concern for many patients, but the amount of radiation involved in dental x-rays is minimal and patients are provided with all possible protections, including a lead-lined apron to cover portions of the body that could be exposed to x-rays. Plus, you’ll only receive x-rays when necessary so as to avoid undue risk.

Many countries have adopted the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendation of 20mSv per year.

Digital x-rays produce a very low level of radiation and are considered safe. The average person gets 3mSv per year, which is well below the average recommendation for a safe level. Half of this radiation comes from background radiation, such as natural radiation from radon in the air.

7. What are the types of X-rays?

There are a few different types of dental x-rays, each with different benefits. You may need multiple types of x-rays in order to create a complete assessment of your oral health.

Bite-wing x-rays are the most common, and they are so called for the plastic wing you bite on to hold the film in place while the x-ray is taken. This type of x-ray shows hard-to-reach molars and bicuspids, where cavities are most likely to form.

There are also periapical x-rays that show an entire tooth all the way to the root; panoramic x-rays that display the entire mouth, including both jaws; and a variety of other x-rays with specific purposes.

8. Is it safe for Children to have dental X-rays?

Many parents are concerned about the impact of dental x-rays on children. Children are more sensitive to radiation. However, the amount of radiation in a dental x-ray is still considered safe for a child. As children’s jaws and teeth are continuously changing, it’s important to keep an eye on their development. These x-rays perform many important purposes for young patients. They help dentists to:

  • Make sure the mouth is large enough to accommodate incoming teeth
  • Monitor the development of wisdom teeth
  • Determine whether primary teeth are loosening properly to accommodate new permanent teeth
  • Identify decay and gum disease early
  • It’s important for children to visit the dentist regularly, and to get x-rays as recommended by the dentist. The exact schedule for these x-rays will vary depending on the child’s individual needs.

9. How often should a child have dental x-ray films?

Since every child is unique, the need for dental x-ray films varies from child to child. Films are taken only after reviewing your child’s medical and dental histories and performing a clinical examination, and only when they are likely to yield information that a visual examination cannot.

In general, children need x-rays more often than adults. Their mouths grow and change rapidly. They are more susceptible than adults to tooth decay. For children with a high risk of tooth decay, our Surrey Dentists recommends x-ray examinations every six months to detect cavities developing between teeth. Children with a low risk of tooth decay require x-rays less frequently.

10. Why should x-ray films be taken if my child has never had a cavity?

X-ray films detect more than cavities. For example, x-rays may be needed to survey erupting teeth, diagnose bone diseases, evaluate results of an injury or plan orthodontic treatment. x-rays allow dentists to diagnose and treat conditions that cannot be detected during a clinical examination. If dental problems are found and treated early, dental care is more comfortable and affordable.

11. Is it safe for pregnant women to have dental x-rays?

Pregnant women are generally advised to avoid dental x-rays. Though the radiation is minimal, it’s best to avoid all exposure when possible for the health of the developing fetus. For this reason, it’s important to tell your dentist if you are or may be pregnant.

However, there are some instances where pregnant women should still have dental x-rays performed. If you have a dental emergency or are in the middle of a dental treatment plan, you may still need x-rays during your pregnancy. Discuss the issue with your dentist to determine the best way to proceed. It’s crucial that you balance both your dental and prenatal health. Women with periodontal disease are at a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, so you should not neglect your teeth during pregnancy.

Your dentist can take greater precautions, such as using a leaded apron and thyroid collar, for all x-rays taken during your pregnancy if the procedure is deemed necessary. Keeping your dentist informed at all times is the best way to proceed.

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Oral Hygiene Education

oral health in surrey

Maintaining optimal oral health is very important. To ensure your gums stay healthy, fresh and clean, we encourage all our patients to have regular dental check-ups and cleaning every 3-6 months. Our dentists are here to help with any questions or concerns regarding daily dental practices like brushing and flossing.


Frequently Asked Questions About Oral Hygiene Education


surrey dentist checkup

1. What is the first thing that you will do while going to a regular oral check-up?

Before anything is done inside your mouth your dentist will need to know about your medical history if this is your first appointment at the dental clinic or, if you have been to the practice before, any changes in your health such as new medications, diabetes, arthritis, pregnancy, etc. It is important that your dental care team knows about any health concerns, anxieties, or allergies you may have in order to avoid incidents and to make sure you get the kind of care you need.

2. What is a teeth examination?

It is having a look at any problem areas in your mouth. A metal probe with a small angled mirror will be used, which will help we see behind and between teeth and gums, as well as check for the softening of tooth enamel and dentin.

We will also be on the lookout for the swelling of gums in any areas, mouth sores, and redness. Finally, we will measure your mouth’s periodontal pockets, which are the spaces between the top of the gum line and where the gum tissues firmly attaches to the tooth. Ideally, this pocket should only be between one and three millimeters deep, however deeper pockets can be a sign of gum disease and thus should be closely monitored.

3. What is a dental exam?

The dental exam is different from the initial teeth examination that your hygienist completed as this one is done by your dentist. They will use your dental x-rays to see if there is any loss of bone, fractures, or any other abnormality below your visible gum line before moving on to look for issues with jaw alignment, teeth grinding, and oral cancer.

Once all of this is done, your dentist should have a full understanding of what your oral health needs are, and will be able to prescribe any necessary dental treatments to prevent or treat your issues.

4. Who Needs Dental X-Rays?

Dental x-rays are used diagnostically to help dentists see issues that are otherwise nearly invisible to the naked eye. Adults receive dental x-rays so dentists can better identify and treat various issues. Using these x-rays, your dental professional provider can see:

  • Areas of decay, including those in between teeth or under a filling
  • Bone loss associated with gum disease
  • Abscesses, which are infections at the root of the tooth or between the tooth and gum
  • Tumors
  • Changes in the root canal

Without an x-ray, many of these problems could go undiagnosed. With an x-ray as a reference, dentists are also better equipped to prepare tooth implantsdenturesInvisalign, and other similar treatments.

5. What happens during a Teeth Cleaning?

We will start by scraping off built-up plaque and tartar that collects above and below the gum line before flossing between and around every tooth to remove any plaque or food particles that are clinging on.

We will also give your teeth a smooth and shiny finish using a tooth polisher with a spinning head and slightly abrasive paste. The polishing will get rid of any residue that was previously missed and will make your teeth smoother so that plaque will not collect as easily on them between visits to the dentist.

6. What are the differences between Hygienist and Certified Dental Assistant (CDA)?

Hygienists are trained dental professionals who take care of routine dental care, such as regular cleanings and assist dentists in other procedures. They are an integral part of any dental practice and make up a big part of the team that works to keep your oral health at its best.

CDAs don’t do as much of the nitty-gritty cleaning work that hygienists do, but they provide excellent help with the preparation work and with assisting dentists during procedures.

You can think of both of these roles as the truly unsung heroes of a dental practice.

7. What is the VELscope® Vx?

The VELscope® Vx is an oral disease visualization device, not an oral cancer diagnostic device. The VELscope® is the first adjunctive device cleared by the FDA and Health Canada to help clinicians visualize cancerous and precancerous lesions and other lesions that might not be apparent to the naked eye. The VELscope is also cleared to help surgeons determine appropriate surgical margins around lesions prior to excision.

The VELscope® Vx is LED Dental Inc.’s newest model release of the VELscope system, and has identical Indications for Use to the original VELscope system.

The VELscope® Vx’s blue light excites natural “fluorophores” in mucosal tissues. The VELscope® Vx’s proprietary filter makes fluorescence visualization possible, by blocking reflected blue light, and by enhancing the contrast between normal and abnormal tissue.

Like other visualization technologies, such as panoramic radiography, CT, MRI, PET and ultrasound, the VELscope is NOT a stand-alone diagnostic test. However, used in conjunction with the standard oral soft tissue exam, VELscope® Vx provides visual information that cannot be acquired in any other way.

8. How long does a VELscope® Vx exam take?

In about 2 minutes, with no rinses, dyes or discomfort, a VELscope® Vx examination helps healthcare professionals assure their patients that their oral mucosa has been assessed to an advanced level of preventative care.

9. Is VELscope® Vx safe?

Yes, the VELscope® Vx system is safe. All that’s being shone into the oral cavity is blue light, generated by light emitting diodes. However, patients with a history of photosensitivity or those using photosensitive medications should not be exposed to the light emitted from the VELscope® Vx device.

10. What is the last thing of a regular oral check-up?

The final step of the routine dental checkup is scheduling your next one for a date 4 to 6 months in the future. Scheduling your next appointment right away is the easiest and most effective way to ensure that you don’t forget to have your dental checkup regularly. Even if you are diligent in your personal dental care, there is no better protection against oral issues than having your mouth professionally cleaned and monitored.


Velscope: Our dental office is not only dedicated to helping you maintain a beautiful smile, we’re also dedicated to your overall health and well-being. We take a different approach to your dental care, which includes an oral cancer screening as a part of your regular exam. Like other cancers, oral cancer can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early. We definitely go the extra mile for our patients!

We have the skills and tools to identify early symptoms and signs of oral cancer and pre-cancerous conditions. While these symptoms may be caused by other problems, it is very important to visit our office to rule out the possibility of oral cancer.


Some Advantages of using the Velscope system:
  1. FDA approved
  2. Can be used in combination with digital photography
  3. Can detects problem areas that cannot be seen under white light
  4. Detects lesions, white and red patches
  5. Helps our dentist check soft tissue
  6. Quick and painless examinations
  7. Helps diagnose oral cancer in its earliest stages

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Oral Surgery

Oral surgery is any procedure that involves cutting into or removing tissue from your mouth. It includes procedures like, gum surgery, getting dental implants or removing a tooth, such as the impacted wisdom tooth in the x-ray below. Oral surgery also includes getting rid of diseased tissue from the mouth, correcting jaw problems, or repairing a cleft lip or palate. The more complicated surgeries such as repairing jaw problems or repairing a cleft lip or palate would be done in a hospital under general anesthetic by an Oral Surgeon.

Frequently Asked Questions About Oral Surgery

1. Who will need an oral surgery?

Oral surgical procedures involve the incision, excision, or reflection of tissue that exposes the normally sterile areas of the oral cavity. Examples are biopsy, periodontal surgery, apical surgery, implant surgery, and surgical extractions of teeth (removal of erupted or nonerupted tooth requiring elevation of the mucoperiosteal flap, removal of bone or section of tooth, and suturing if needed).

2. Who will need periodontal surgery?

Periodontal or “gum” surgery is needed when conservative non-surgical treatments are ineffective in completely eradicating the periodontal disease. Luckily, periodontal surgery is a very simple and extremely effective technique to treat advanced periodontal problems.

3. What is apical surgery?

Apical surgery is considered a standard oral surgical procedure. It is often the last resort to surgically maintain a tooth with a periapical lesion that cannot be managed with conventional endodontic (re-)treatment. The main goal of apical surgery is to prevent bacterial leakage from the root-canal system into the periradicular tissues by placing a tight root-end filling following root-end resection. A major step in apical surgery is to identify possible leakage areas at the cut root face and subsequently to ensure adequate root-end filling. Only a tight and persistent apical obturation will allow periapical healing with good long-term prognosis.

4. When do I need a surgical extraction of teeth?

If a more volatile tooth has yet to grow in, however, your dentist needs to remove gum tissue or bone in order to extract it. This is called a surgical extraction and requires stitches to close the site so that it can heal properly.  If a tooth breaks off during the procedure, for instance, it may need to be taken out in pieces. Wisdom teeth often face surgical extraction because they are usually impacted, meaning they are not completely erupted into the mouth. This condition requires cutting through bone and tissue. Removing severely broken down teeth, root tips or teeth with long-curved roots are other examples of surgical extractions. Then there are times when the bone around a tooth has become dense, resulting in the need for surgical treatment.

5. What will happen during my procedure?

Your oral surgeon/dentist will explain how they plan to perform your surgery. Without having to get into too many specifics, you will know where your incision is being made, and any other details about what the procedure entails and what the goal is.

6. Do I need to be sedated during my oral surgery instead of the local anesthesia?

A dentist will request in-depth past medical history before a patient can be sedated. Not all patients are able to be sedated. Patients who are anxious, nervous, or scared of dental visits may request sedation for a variety of dental care from a regular cleaning to wisdom teeth extractions. However, there may be other techniques to help a patient receive the necessary dental treatment in a safe and comfortable manner.

7. How long will the procedure take?

It depends on which oral surgery that your dentist consulted you to take. It could be from one hour to four hours or more. Ask your dentist for more details to suit your schedule.

8. How long is the recovery?

It depends on the kind of oral surgery. Wisdom teeth extraction usually takes a few days to one week for the pain and swelling to subside. The gums can take up to a month to completely heal. Your dentist will recommend a soft diet for a few days and provide detailed recovery instructions, such as how to deal with discomfort and swelling. Dental implants also require some healing time and this varies from patient to patient and procedure to procedure.

9. What food should I eat and avoid after surgery?

For 2 days after surgery, drink liquids and eat soft foods only. Such as milkshakes, eggnog, yogurt, cooked cereals, cottage cheese, smooth soups, mashed potatoes, refried beans, ice cream, pudding, fruit smoothies and protein shakes. On day 3 after surgery, eat soft foods that do not require much chewing, such as macaroni and cheese, cooked noodles, soft-boiled /scrambled/ poached eggs and soft sandwiches. Avoid tough or crunchy foods, such as pizza, rice, popcorn, and hamburger. Avoid spicy and acidic foods. Most patients may resume their normal diet 7 days after surgery.

10. What should not you do after oral surgery?

  • Do not apply heat to your face, unless your surgeon told you to do so.
  • Heat can increase swelling.
  • Do not use straws, suck on anything, or smoke.
  • These actions cause negative pressure in your mouth, which can dislodge the blood clot that is keeping your wound closed, causing more bleeding, and delay your healing.
  • Do not blow your nose. Wipe instead.  If you need to sneeze, do so with your mouth open.
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Emergency Dental Services

We’ve all been there.

A toothache that wakes you up in the middle of the night. The sudden accident that knocks out a tooth. The crunchy snack that chips a tooth or breaks a filling. Well, maybe we haven’t all experienced accidentally losing a tooth, but we all know it can happen easily and without warning.
Any of these can mean pain, or difficulty with normal activities like eating, drinking, sleeping, even breathing. But, what else do dental emergencies have in common?

Anxiety, worry, concern. It’s normal. Many people don’t know what to do when a dental emergency happens.


  1. Should you rush to the hospital?
  2. Can a lost tooth be saved?
  3. Is it okay to take painkillers?
  4. Is there anything you can or should do while waiting for treatment?

So many questions – but in an emergency, you should know that the first thing you should do is call a dentist. If you don’t have one, please call our Surrey Dental Clinic at: (604) 597-8808

Here are some tips for common dental emergencies:

types of cracked tooth vancouver

  1. For a knocked-out permanent or adult tooth, keep it moist at all times. If you can, try placing the tooth back in the socket without touching the root. If that’s not possible, place it in between your cheek and gums, in milk, or use a tooth preservation product that has the CDA Seal of Acceptance. Then, get to My Dentist @ Boundary Park in Surrey, BC right away.
  2. For a cracked tooth, immediately rinse the mouth with warm water to clean the area. Put cold compresses on the face to keep any swelling down.
  3. If you bite your tongue or lip, clean the area gently with water and apply a cold compress.
  4. For toothaches, rinse the mouth with warm water to clean it out. Gently use dental floss to remove any food caught between the teeth. Do not put aspirin on the aching tooth or gum tissues.
  5. For objects stuck in the mouth, try to gently remove with floss but do not try to remove it with sharp or pointed instruments.

When you have a dental emergency, it’s important to visit our Surrey Dental Office on 120th Street in Surrey or an emergency room as soon as possible.

Here are some simple precautions you can take to avoid accident and injury to the teeth:

  • Wear a mouthguard when participating in sports or recreational activities.
  • Avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and hard candy, all of which can crack a tooth.
  • Use scissors, NEVER your teeth, to cut things.

At My Dentist @ Boundary Park, our Surrey Dentists reserve time in their daily schedules for emergency patients. Call our Surrey Dental Office at (604) 597-8808 and provide as much detail as possible about your dental emergency.

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